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2016 Wyoming State Fair Edition

Written by Emilee Gibb

Inside the August 27th Roundup

Written by WyLR





Here's a preview of the August 27 edition of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup.
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Taking the top
Wurdeman exhibits top market beef at Wyo State Fair
Douglas – During the week of Aug. 15, the Wyoming State Fair drew cattle producers and youth from across Wyoming, Nebraska and Utah to compete for the honors of top market beef animal. With 120 entries in the market show, Garrett Wurdeman won the contest with his steer, purchased from LeClair Cattle Company in Lander.
          Wurdeman says, “It’s awesome to win State Fair this year. I won in 2013, and my brother had the reserve champion in 2014 and 2015. It’s cool to meet our goals and win the State Fair.
          He also notes that this year, he had some challenges with his steer, but the last several weeks before fair, things started to come together.
          “It was really tough to break this steer,” Wurdeman comments. “In the last two weeks, he really came together. He has good muscle, big bones and good feet. He was just a good steer overall.”

 

Hearing held for weather modification feasibility study in Laramie Range
Douglas – Interested individuals from around Wyoming were invited to attend a public hearing on Aug. 18 for a weather modification feasibility study performed in the Laramie Range. This hearing was a follow-up for an initial public hearing that was held last year.
          “The main focus of this talk here today is for us to present the findings from the feasibility study for the Laramie Range,” said Desert Research Institute Associate Research Scientist Arlen Huggins.
          Numerous factors impact the ability to cloud seed during a storm, such as temperature, wind direction, the presence of frozen water droplets and cloud base elevation.
          “Casper Mountain is a big hot spot. About half of the storms coming through there were seedable,” commented Desert Research Institute Associate Research Scientist Frank McDonough.

 

Ergot toxicity
          The Big Horn Basin has seen an increase in the prevalence of ergot, a fungus that impacts cereal crops and grasses due to cool, wet weather. Many livestock species are very susceptible to ergot and should be managed carefully when using infested feed.

 

BLM update
          Wyoming BLM State Director Mary Jo Rugwell gave an opening statement on the current direction and goals of the BLM in Wyoming during the Select Federal Natural Resource Management Committee meeting in Casper on Aug. 18, citing collaboration and partnership as vital to land management.

 

Also inside the Roundup this week:

  • Groups hamper species conservation efforts.
  • Simplifying beef preparation is innovation that will attract consumers.
  • Farms and ranches recognized for 100 years in operation during WSF event.
  • 2016 Wyoming State Fair livestock shows results.
  • Perman shares knowledge of ranching life with future generations.